Posts Tagged ‘Ashok Advani’

‘Indian TV is like nautanki, a real-life soap opera’

6 March 2013

Malvika Singh, whose parents Raj and Romesh Thapar started Seminar magazine (and whose attempt to start a news channel for Ashok Advani‘s Business India magazine in the mid-1990s is the stuff of media lore), in The Telegraph, Calcutta:

“An intellectually lazy press corps that controls and operates the electronic media in India, drowning us all in its short bites and screams, virtually taking on the garb of the politician on the soap box, has dumbed down the discourse. It has no idea of how to divide reporting from analysis as it allows the two to merge seamlessly into a stream of confusion and one-sided chatter.

“The other example of that laziness can be found in the guests who appear on all the channels — about the same 40 people who are tossed about as in a caesar salad. No fresh views, no new voices.

“Television was meant to be a tool that would access far-flung views and voices in an effort to expand the real news from the ground as well as the dialogue. Instead, each channel is predictable in its reactions to political happenings and one can clearly ascertain the personal political preferences of the owners and the anchors in the construct of their programmes.

“Indian television is like a nautanki, a soap opera, watched for the ‘live’ entertainment it provides as it shows real life leaders of India prancing about abusing one another, thereby demeaning themselves in full public view.”

Photograph: courtesy Tehelka

Paparazzi pic of Bollywood babe sans makeup

23 June 2010

If Indian journalism is uniformly second-rate, you ain’t seen nothing yet, Aakarbhai.

Let Kanchan Gupta of The Pioneer tell you a story:

“The popular Gujarati newspaper Sandesh had an interesting story about aspiring journalists who appeared for this year’s entrance test for the media course offered by Saurashtra University.

“I have no idea about the quality of the course, but it would be safe to presume that those who applied for admission are from average middle-class families, representatives of what political parties, particularly the Congress, refer to as aam admi—the common man, average Indian, or whatever term you may want to use for the masses.

“The answer scripts have revealed that among the applicants are those who believe Warren Anderson is a Hollywood superstar and (though not connected with the Bhopal tragedy) Teesta Setalvad is a Bollywood actress.”

Journalism students please note: activist Teesta is a former journalist at Ashok Advani‘s Business India. Sandesh is India’s first stock-market listed newspaper

Read the full piece: Rip van Winkle wakes up to Bhopal

Also read: Outlook magazine ranking of top-10 J-schools-2010

Hindustan Times‘ ranking of top-10 J-schools—2010

Hindustan Times‘ ranking of top-10 J-schools—2008

Tehelka announces its school of journalism

‘A List’ most A-listers don’t want to be a part of

19 September 2009

The Indian edition of Campaign has brought out a booklet called “The A List”, supposedly the who’s who in media, marketing and advertising, in partnership with NDTV Media.

And the sloppy, incomplete and typo-ridden effort is remarkable for how predictable and boring most A-listers are: the most-admired politician—surprise, surprise—is Mahatma Gandhi, almost everybody’s favourite device is the Blackberry™, etcetera.

Still there are a few trends to be spotted:

# Most owners have a marked inclination not to reveal more of themselves. The Times of India‘s Samir and Vineet Jain; Dainik Bhaskar‘s Sudhir Agarwal; India Today‘s Aroon Purie; Network 18’s Raghav Bahl; NDTV’s Prannoy and Radhika Roy; Sun TV’s Kalanidhi Maran; India TV’s Rajat Sharma; Hindustan TimesShobhana Bharatiya et al haven’t bothered to fill up the form.

# The list is so Bombay-Delhi centric that it would seem that the South and East of India are in some other country. Result: India’s biggest publications like Malayala Manorama, Ananda Bazar Patrika, Eenadu, Dina Thanthi, have no representation in a 100-rupee booklet that claims to represent “our entire ecosystem” (editor Anant Rangaswami‘s description).

# The new media goes almost completely unrepresented but for the presence of blogger Amit Varma, and many (Mid-Day‘s Tarique Ansari, NDTV’s Raj Nayak) admit they are technologically challenged.

# In a list teeming with people born in small-town India (Meerut, Madurai, Rohtak, Ratlam, Dhanbad, Kanpur, Karur, Manipal, Varanasi), many were born elsewhere: Business India founder Ashok Advani born in Hyderabad (Sindh); Outlook editor-in-chief Vinod Mehta, Rawalpindi; India Today proprietor Aroon Purie, Lahore, and COO Mala Sekhri, London; CNBC’s Senthil Chengalvarayan, Kandy, Sri Lanka; A.P. Parigi, ex-Radio Mirchi head, Colombo; Vaishnavi Communications’ Neera Radia, Kenya; INX chief Peter Mukherjea, London.

Also read: 26% of India’s powerful are media barons

The 11 habits of India’s most powerful media pros

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