Posts Tagged ‘China’

’50-60% China coverage in TOI, HT adversarial’

11 November 2013

A six-month study of India-China coverage in the top-two English newspapers in New Delhi shows that between 50 and 60 per cent of the stories are of adversarial nature, “establishing a pattern of clear negative China coverage”.

The Delhi editions of The Times of India and the Hindustan Times, both of which have correspondents based in Beijing, were surveyed by Debasish Roy Choudhury, who works for the Hong Kong-based South China Morning Post.

“Though a substantial part of their coverage is also neutral, even peaceable, the numerically dominant frames are clearly antagonistic. These frames identify China as an aggressive power… and convey remedies such as arming, border build-up and alliances with other powers. The adversarial frame is propagated through other kinds of stories as well where the general tone is conflictual….

“A closer look at how China is portrayed in top English-language papers can broadly be taken as a proxy for how it is generally portrayed in Indian newspapers….

“English-language dailies do not all follow a consistent line or pattern of coverage on any subject. For example, The Hindu, a hugely respected and highly circulated paper in southern India with an edition in Delhi, and The Telegraph, a comparatively smaller paper but the market leader in eastern India, are noticeably conciliatory and balanced in overall tone towards China, and differ substantially from the China coverage of, say, the Times of India. “

In a story in the Hong Kong-based South China Morning Post, where he works as a business news editor, Roy Chowdhury quotes the veteran jurist A.G. Noorani.

“Shrill, jingoistic and embarrassing,” is how A.G. Noorani describes Indian media’s China reportage. “Every now and then the media breaks into a patriotic frenzy over anonymously sourced reports of border violations without bothering to explain the intricacies of our tangled frontiers.”

Infographics: courtesy Debasish Roy Choudhury

Also read: Role of the press in India-China relations

China Daily hands back occupied areas to India

Hu, Wen and why China scorns Indian media

Media freedom is what separates India from China

Rupert Murdoch on India, China and democracy

The Hindu had a discernible pro-China tilt on Tibet’

The Hindu‘ and a scribe who was told to ‘shut up’

EPW tears into TV’s ‘hawks, hotheads, hysteria’

The Hindu and ‘a scribe’ who was told to shut up

4 November 2011

The pro-China tilt of “the world’s most readable newspaper“, The Hindu, used to be grist for the gossip mills, till one of the warring brothers of the family-owned newspaper himself decided to put it on record. An incident in Delhi on Thursday involving China’s ambassador to India underlines the insinuation some more.

At a function to promote the Xijiang province of China, Ambassador Zhang Yan was asked by a business journalist about a distorted map of India, showing parts of Jammu and Kashmir and Arunachal Pradesh as being a part of China. By most news reports, the ambassador asked the reporter to “shut up” and then tried to make peace.

Below are the headlines from some newspapers:

The Times of India: “Distorted map puts China envoy in spot”

Hindustan Times: “China gets map wrong, envoy yells ‘shut up'”

Indian Express: “China envoy in row over India map”

The Pioneer: “China envoy tells scribe to ‘shut up'”

Asian Age: “Chinese envoy tells a journo to ‘shut up'”

Mail Today: “Envoy snubs journo for raising map issue”

The Statesman: “Spat over India map”

The Economic Times: “Chinese envoy tells reporter to shut up”

The Tribune: “Chinese envoy snubs Indian scribe”

DNA: “Why Chinese envoy told Indian scribe to shut up”

And here is the headline from The Hindu:

Journalist’s bid to disrupt function

The paper’s “special correspondent” goes the extra mile to provide additional perspective to the incident:

“A scribe who had gained entry on the basis of his media credentials decided to take matters in his hand and clambered on the stage protesting the inclusion in the map of “parts of India” in China.

“As chaos reigned and the journalist, joined by another person, continued to give vent to his feelings from the state, Zhang told him to “shut up”. This further inflamed the scribe who was then pacified by Zhang and a senior foreign office official.

“The hour-long disruption left many in the audience stunned and dissatisfied as this was the first time a business delegation led by its governor had come to India. China is investing heavily in the Xinjiang province and Pakistani businessmen, along with theri counterparts from bordering central Asian counrties, have already made inroads into the region.”

Also read: Why China scorns the Indian media

The Indian Express stands up for The Economist

Censorship in the name of ‘national interest’

If a report isn’t ‘wrong’, surely it must be ‘right’?

Chinese hackers break into The Times of India

Never believe anything until it’s officially denied

One paper’s 40% threat is another’s 60% dud

Why Chinese children are learning Hindi

13 May 2010

Indian publishers are relentlessly cutting expenditure. Meanwhile, The Economist “newspaper”—one of the few profitable publications even during the downturn—unveils its maiden television campaign in India.

View another Economist TVC here

Link via Chetan Krishnaswamy

***

Also read: If it catches your eye, surely the ad’s working?

Funny joke from a balding journalist-blogger*

How to get from point B to point A in Chicago

One paper’s 40% threat is another’s 60% dud

4 December 2009

The relationship between India and China has in recent months become, as the cliche goes, the cynosure of all eyes. Border roads and dams; military incursions; a row over the Dalai Lama; illegal Chinese workers on Indian soil, Google™ maps, all have become milestones in the steady escalation of tensions.

The media has been at the centre of the dispute, and there is a feeling that “sections of the Indian media” (in other words, “anti-China media”) have been inclined to ratchet up the volume, ostensibly at the nod of their American, capitalist masters.

But could the opposite also be equally true? That “sections of the Indian media” (in other words, “pro-China media”) have been inclined to play down the tensions, ostensibly at the nod of their Chinese, communist masters?

Some proof comes from the manner in which the Lowy Institute for International Policy‘s survey of Chinese attitudes about their country and its place in the world is being reported.

# Exhibit A, above, is from the December 2 edition of The Indian Express, New Delhi, whose Delhi-based correspondent avers that 40 per cent of Chinese think India is their country’s biggest threat “after the United States”.

# Exhibit B, below, is from the December 4 edition of The Hindu, Madras, whose Beijing correspondent reports that environmental issues are perceived to be the biggest challenges facing their country. “60 per cent of Chinese did not view India as a threat…, only 34% viewed India as a threat an the rest were non-committal.”

For the record, prime minister Manmohan Singh said during his recent State visit to the United States that he could not understand the reasons for China’s recent “assertiveness”.

Newspaper facsimiles: courtesy The Indian Express and The Hindu

Also read: Is India right in barring foreign media?

Censorship in the name of “national interest”?

Is India right in barring foreign journalists?

7 November 2009

The Great Wall between India and China is not made of bricks and mortar; it is made of freedom and liberty. Any debate, any discussion, anywhere, on the superpowers-to-be is sealed, signed and delivered by the roaring presence of those essential ingredients in plentiful on our soil, and the utter lack of it in our great neighbour.

China notoriously detests dissent—and democracy.

It bars foreign media from freely moving inside its boundaries; Tibet is off-limits to them as is Tiananmen Square. BBC was famously taken off Rupert Murdoch‘s Star Network at the behest of the comrades. Google and Yahoo effortlessly dance to the tunes of the Chinese dictators. Chinese citizens routinely can’t log into YouTube, Facebook and other media. And so on.

But has difference between “us” and “them” been erased by the Congress-led UPA government?

In barring foreign journalists from going to Tawang in Arunachal Pradesh to report the Tibetan spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama‘s week-long visit to the northeastern State which China off and on claims as its own, has the Manmohan Singh government thumbed its  nose at India’s great democratic traditions?

Has India missed a trick in showing its inviolable sovereignty before a global audience? In behaving much like China would, has the Congress-led regime obliterated the difference between democracy and dictatorship? Or was the government right given the war-mongering that has recently been on display?

Also read: Media freedom is what separates India and China

Censorship in the name of ‘the national interest’?

Iran to China, Newsweek has the story covered

20 October 2009

NEWSWEEK FAREED ZAKARIA Newsweek magazine cover

More wisdom from the all-seeing, all-knowing editors of Newsweek*.

On the left, the cover of the June 1, 2009 issue. Coverline: “Everything you think you know about Iran is wrong“.

On the right, the cover of the October 26, 2009 issue. Coverline: “Everything you know about China is wrong“.

Also read: Who, why, when, how, where, what, what the…

How a slumdweller became a Newsweek reporter

*Disclosures apply

Media freedom is what separates India & China

5 June 2009

No media debate on Asia is complete with0ut comparing India to China, or vice-versa. Even among middle-class media consumers, there is a barely disguised contempt for the slow pace of growth in democratic India, for all the “obstacles” in the path of progress and development, compared with the frenetic pace in The Middle Kingdom.

But is there a comparison to be made at all?

Is China really in India’s league, notwithstanding the growth rate, the forex reserves, etc? This is a CNN video of its Beijing correspondent attempting to go to Tiananmen Square on 4 June 2009, the 20th anniversary of the massacre, before being engulfed by umbrella-weilding “undercover” police.

As the legendary Atlantic Monthly correspondent James Fallows, now based in Beijing, writes:

“This is the kind of thing that makes you hold your head and say: Rising major power in the world?”

And this, on top of a ban on Twitter and Facebook, and censorship of television stories which begin with “In China today…” or “Twenty years ago in Bei….”

Also read: James Fallows: The June 4 report

T.J.S. George in China: Part I, Part II, Part III, Part IV, Part V, Part VI

How Cisco helps China in internet censorship

4 April 2009

It’s not just authoritarian governments that are preventing citizens and activists from accessing news and views that they would not like them to lay their eyes and ers on. Transnational corporations that supply the technology to make access possible in the first place are playing a hand, according to Al Jazeera‘s media show, The Listening Post.

Simon Ostrovsky reveals that giant companies like the San Francisco-based Cisco (“The Human Network”) which supply the hardware for internet networks often also supply the commercial software, and cooperate more closely with regimes than previously imagined. Cisco, of course, denies the charge.

The top-15 media stories (& viral videos) of ’08

6 January 2009

The strange thing about the so-called Global Village is that it has turned us all provincial. We relate to, are interested in, connect with, and remember news events with an insularity that would befuddle Marshall McLuhan. And in the process, we forget that stuff happens outside of the bubble we inhabit.

The Listening Post, the world-class media show on Al Jazeera English hosted by Richard Gizbert, has compiled the stories and personalities that dominated the global media in 2008, in association with Influence Communications, the Canadian media analysts who look at more than a billion TV items from 160 countries.

And the winner? The US presidential election which occupied a grand total of 6.5 million minutes of airtime around the world. On election November 8, and the day after, an average of 21 television news items per second were aired worldwide. The full list is as under:

1) US presidential elections

2) War in Iraq

3) Global economic meltdown

4) The Beijing Olympics

5) War in Afghanistan

6) Oil prices and climate change

7) Nicholas Sarkozy and Carlo Bruni

8) Tibet during the Olympic torch relay

9) Conflict over South Ossetia betwen Russia and Georgia

10) Pakistan after Benazir Bhutto and Pervez Musharraf

11) 60th anniversary of Israel’s creation

12) European football championships

13) Iran’s nuclear programme

14) Zimbabwe’s political and economic troubles

15) Earthquake in western China

Rupert Murdoch on India, China and democracy

21 September 2008

The controversial media mogul, Rupert Murdoch, on India and China, in Esquire:

“Any company that is global cannot ignore China or India. They are just enormous, emerging great powers. I enjoy China. I have a lot of friends there. But all we have there are the moment is a few very minor investments.

“India is different. India is a democracy—imperfect, but a democracy. And there is a rule of law there where you know exactly where you stand. It’s a difficlt country. There are so many languages. We’re just beginning to spread beyond Hindi into other languages so our channels will become more national.”

Read the full article: Rupert Murdoch has potential

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