Posts Tagged ‘Deccan Chronicle’

‘Deccan Chronicle’ says TOI is stealing its ads!

6 December 2014

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classified both2 copy

Nothing is impossible in the merry world of Indian journalism.

Big newspapers (and magazines) flick stories from small ones without as much as acknowledgement. Big TV stations conduct whole debates on issues first flagged by newspapers (and magazines) without so much as a by-your-leave.

But at least there’s a word for it: plagiarism. What’s the equivalent in advertising?

In a first, the embattled Hyderabad newspaper Deccan Chronicle has accused The Times of India of stealing its “classified advertisements” and passing them off as its own.

Deccan Chronicle says between January 2013 and June 2013, nearly 1,000 such classifieds which first appeared in DC also appeared in ToI.

DC now has filed a criminal complaint against ToI.

For the record, Deccan Chronicle has been under attack from ToI in the Hyderabad market for the financial sins of its promoter, T. Venkatram Reddy.

Also, for the record, Hyderabad is the one city where ToI has not managed to make great headway. After 14 years of publication, one recent issue of the newspaper in September had 16 in-house advertisements.

Read the full story: TOI-ing with readers

‘International Herald Tribune’ becomes INYT

14 October 2013

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The legendary International Herald Tribune (IHT) has published its last print issue today with its current mastead. From tomorrow, 15 October 2013, it will be sold under the name-plate “International New York Times” (INYT).

IHT’s name-change isn’t the first.

The New York Herald, launched in 1887 in Europe, became the New York Herald Tribune, which became the International Herald Tribune. International New York Times marks the complete takeover of the IHT by NYT after The Washington Post pulled out of the collaboration a few years ago.

The Indian edition of IHT has been published by the Deccan Chronicle out of Hyderabad despite the group’s extraordinary troubles, by a complex circumvention of publishing laws. And despite his exit from The Asian Age, also published by DC, M.J. Akbar was IHT‘s titular editor.

Also read: How International Herald Tribune is made

Ex-IHT journalist goes missing from Rishikesh

How seven cartoonists drew one TOI cartoon

27 August 2013

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As part of its dodransbicentennial celebrations, The Times of India has published “a cavalcade of cartoons over 175 years”. Titled “Jest in Time“, it is put together by Ajit Ninan, Neelabh Banerjee and Jug Suraiya.

At its launch in New Delhi on Monday, seven well-known cartoonists—Sudhir Tailang from Deccan Chronicle, Manjul from Daily News and Analysis, Keshav from The Hindu, Jayanto from Hindustan Times and R. Prasad from Mail Today—joined hands to produce a cartoon (in picture, above) on the spot.

Saira Kurup reports on the jugal bandi:

“Keshav set the tone by drawing the new common man forced to tighten his belt in difficult times. Tailang followed with an illustration showing P.V. Narasimha Rao giving his ‘student’ PM Manmohan Singh a poor report card. Manjul’s version of the common man was one who doesn’t speak but tweets instead!

“Jayanta then drew the laughs by drawing a neta with a loudspeaker as his head “because netas are not doing what they are supposed to; they just keep shouting!” To audience applause, Ninan put the artwork in context by sketching Parliament, and Banerjee gave the final touch by showing the common man holding up the House on his shoulders.”

Image: courtesy The Times of India

A national newspaper goes ‘local’ in Bangalore

17 June 2013

NEWHINDU

The Hindu has unveiled a new hyper-local look in Bangalore with the tagline “Bringing Bangalore Back to You”.

Writes the paper’s editor Siddharth Varadarajan in a front-page note:

“Why you might ask. After all, Bangalore has known The Hindu for its credible, fearless and unfettered reportage. For never dumbing down. For vanguard journalism that brings the world to your doorstep. But Bangalore has evolved, and so have we. So we bring Bangalore back to you….

“We bring the city to you in a chic new design with a fresh clutch of content: sharp investigative stories and new columns in the main edition, and a crosses and mains neighbourhood view of your locality in Bangalore Local, our weekend special.”

For the record, The Times of India leads the Bangalore market, with Deccan Herald a distant number 2, followed by Bangalore Mirror. The Hindu, The New Indian Express, Deccan Chronicle and DNA are all jostling for the fourth to seventh places in India’s most crowded English newspaper market.

How Sarojini Naidu’s son helped launch a paper

24 May 2013

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The Times of India has turned 175; its rival in Hyderabad, Deccan Chronicle, has turned 75.

Despite the travails the publicly listed company is publicly going through, Andhra Pradesh’s No.1 English daily has kicked off its 75th anniversary celebrations through 75 artists who have joined hands to pay tribute to the spirit of Hyderabad with an exhibition at the Salar Jung museum.

And on the pages of the paper, the paper’s embattled owner T. Venkatram Reddy has a short note:

The Deccan Chronicle is as integral a part of Hyderabad as the Charminar. Deccan Chronicle was conceived by three friends — a journalist Theodre La Touche, an advocate, B. R Chari and Sarojini Naidu’s son, a homeopath, M.N. Jaisoorya. They sold the idea of an “everybody’s paper” to Mr Rajagopal who supplied papers to the Nizam’s government Press. Thus was born the Deccan Chronicle in 1938.

“From those patriotism-filled pre-independence days, Deccan Chronicle has retained its position as the leading newspaper and has only grown stronger as the ‘people’s paper’.

“The expansion and modernization of Deccan Chronicle began when my father, the late T. Chandrashekhar Reddy, acquired DC in 1977. As the city changed and evolved, so did its people. And along with them changed and grew the Chronicle.”

The paper’s editor, A.T. Jayanti, writes:

“As we complete 75 fantastic years, we look forward with excitement and energy. We are ready for the learning curve that the changing technology of the ‘now’ generation will demand of us. This is a familiar challenge.

“Each time a new medium of communication has been introduced, the pundits have predicted the end of newspapers. On each occasion, we have integrated the new with the old and converted it into a win-win situation for you, the reader, by providing the latest news, views and visuals, and for us by garnering increasing readership.

“We find that the explosion of news and views on every new platform — 24×7 live TV, Internet news sites, Facebook, Twitter, blogs and online comments — has only helped make newspapers more relevant. Readers depend on newspapers to make sense of all the cacophony, filter and present the fragmented picture in a sober and fuller manner.

“TV depends on the print medium to promote its programmes. Online achievements and apps benefit from newspaper coverage. We can say with quiet pride that when something goes viral, the readers learn of it through DC.”

Coming soon: ‘Deccan Herald’ from New Delhi

24 August 2011

Bangalore’s oldest English newspaper, Deccan Herald, is launching an edition in New Delhi, making it the first South Indian publication to reach out to readers and advertisers in the North with a decidedly South Indian title.

There has been no formal announcement from the family-owned group yet, but the buzz is that the edition may take off as early as this December, to coincide with the 100th anniversary of New Delhi as the capital of India.

An advertisement in the Delhi edition of The Hindu makes DH‘s plans clear. The ad seeks a news editor, sub-editors, city and sports reporters, artists and photojournalists “for its edition in the national capital.”

The Madras-based Hindu has long printed an edition from Delhi, but “Hindu” is a generic name with wider appeal. And the Hyderabad-based Deccan Chronicle comes out in Delhi and other cities as The Asian Age.

The “Deccan” in DH‘s title presents an altogether different challenge in terms of acceptance, especially among non-Karnataka readers unaware of the brand, its values or its core strengths.

The 63-year-old Deccan Herald pondered the possibilities of editions in the southern States in the mid 1990s, but was pegged back by a fractious family fight among the three brothers who own the paper (K.N. Hari Kumar, K.N. Tilak Kumar and K.N. Shanth Kumar) and the concomitant success of the revamped Bangalore edition of The Times of India.

DH‘s northern foray in 2011 comes after a division of responsibilities in the family helped stave off the challenge thrown by new entrants Deccan Chronicle and DNA on its home turf, and retrieve some lost ground, although ToI is the leader in Bangalore by a long way.

Also read: How Deccan Herald welcomed the Republic of India

Finally, a redesign not done by Mario Garcia

A package deal that’s well worth a second look

B’lore journos, papers in mining scam report

19 August 2011

As the epicentre of illegal mining that has already claimed a chief minister’s scalp, it was just a matter of time before the media in Karnataka too got embroiled in the dirt and grime of slush money.

And sure enough, Bangalore’s oldest English daily newspaper, Deccan Herald, carries a report today which swings the spotlight on journalists and others associated with journalism.

The news report, authored by Asha Krishnaswamy, shows payments made by a mining company to various individuals and institutions.

Among the identifiable names are those of two English newspapers (Deccan Chronicle and Bangalore Mirror). The initials which bear a likeness to two wellknown Kannada journalists, and an aviation company promoted by a media baron with print and TV interests in two States, are also on the list. Besides a “press club function” also finds mention.

The purpose for which the payments were made is not clear.

The documents showing the payments were allegedly seized by income-tax authorities from the managing director of one of the firms involved in “illegal mining activities”. They form part of the U.V. Singh report that was part of Lok Ayukta Santosh Hegde‘s report that felled B.S. Yediyurappa.

Although no denomination is mentioned alongside the figures, a la the Jain hawala diaries, the Deccan Herald report says that it is “obvious” that is in rupees/ lakhs. All the 55 accused whose initials figured in the Jain dairies were acquitted.

Screenshot: courtesy Deccan Herald

Read the full stories: Illegal mining fed the tribe of bribe

Also read: ‘Editors are lobbying on behalf of corporations’

Bangalore journos named in site allotment scam

Only in India: 90% off for journalists!

Cash transfer scheme is already here for journalists

Media houses are sitting on plots leased at one rupee!

Anti-corruption campaigner’s “error of judgement”

The WikiLeak cable on the journalist who…

‘Editors, senior journalists must declare assets’

NDTV reporter wins domestic violence case

6 July 2011

Jennifer Arul, the longtime face of NDTV from Madras, is in the news, with the settlement of the domestic violence case she had filed against her husband.

While the story makes it to the city pages of the Madras editions of both The Times of India and Deccan Chronicle, there is no mention of it in The Hindu, although she did a stint at NDTV-Hindu as editorial advisor.

Newspaper image: courtesy The Times of India

Link via Nagarathna Sitaram

‘The most prolific journalist of our times’

11 June 2011

Khushwant Singh on his Illustrated Weekly of India protege M.J. Akbar, in The Telegraph, Calcutta, the “unputdownable” Calcutta paper founded by Akbar in 1982:

M.J. Akbar must be the most prolific journalist of our times. He heads the editorial board of India Today, edits The Sunday Guardian financed by Ram Jethmalani, and writes for many other papers including The Times of India. He frequently appears on television channels and has over a dozen books to his credit. His latest is Tinderbox: The Past and Future of Pakistan. He is tireless and highly readable.

“I take credit for some of Akbar’s achievements, like a father would of his son’s successes. Akbar started his journalistic career as a trainee picked by me. He met his wife-to-be in my office and nominated me the godfather of his daughter. Few people could be closer than he and I.

“Despite our closeness, I went woefully wrong on one important issue. I had assumed that, like me, he was an agnostic. He is a devout Muslim. He fasts throughout the month of Ramzan but celebrates Id-ul Fitr in my home. He has performed the Haj pilgrimage to Mecca and Medina.

“He has many years to go before he retires. By the time of his retirement, I expect him to have done much by which posterity will remember him.”

For the record, Akbar’s name also appears as editor of the Indian edition of the International Herald Tribune, published by Deccan Chronicle from Hyderabad, in an arrangement with the New York Times.

Photograph: courtesy The Telegraph

Also read: ‘Never let your head stoop as a journalist’

‘News is the subtlest form of advertising’

‘In fractured media, the word is the common fact’

Look, who inspired R.K. Laxman‘s common man!

When a film star weds a journalist, it’s news—II

26 April 2011

Indian film stars—like politicians, businessmen, cricketers and others—rarely have anything nice to say about journalists and journalism, except when they have something to sell. Some, like Amitabh Bachchan and Ram Gopal Verma, have built a cottage industry biting the hand that feeds them to the masses.

How nice therefore to find an inhabitant of tinsel world say “I do” to one of our own.

The Malayalam heartthrob Prithviraj Sukumaran tied the knot with Supriya Menon, the BBC’s business correspondent based in Bombay, in the latter’s home town of Palghat, on Monday. A reception has been planned in Ernakulam for May 1.

The two apparently met a year ago while Supriya was reporting on southern cinema, presumably for the BBC weekend programme, India Business Report, of which she was anchor-correspondent for a while.

“My wife was working as a reporter for a TV news channel. Being a South Indian, she was assigned to do a feature on South Indian cinema. When she called me, I was watching a special screening of SRK’s Don and could not talk to her and told her I would call her back. Next day, when I returned her call, coincidentally she was also watching Don. While that feature did not happen, due to this one call, we started talking and we discovered that we had the same view on the film. Also, we were coincidentally both reading The Fountainhead at that time. And then Shantaram happened and I was so fascinated by how Gregory David Roberts painted Mumbai in the book that I wanted to come to Mumbai and see Haji Ali and Leopold cafe. She showed me around and we fell in love through Bombay that later lead to us getting married.”

But Indo-Asian New Service (IANS), quoting the bride’s groom’s mother reports, that the two families knew each other for a long time and the couple were “childhood friends”.

The Times of India, quoting unnamed sources, says what attracted the film star to the journalist was her “intellectual quotient”.

The New Indian Express reports that local photographers and TV channels were not allowed inside the wedding venue. While over a dozen private photographers covered the function, the bride and groom left “without speaking to the journalists waiting outside the gate”.

Deccan Chronicle, which apparently broke the news of the “whirlwind romance” and the impending wedding only for it to be described as “baseless journalism” by the actor, reports that Prithviraj’s wedding to the journalist has broken the hearts of thousands of his female fans.

Photograph: courtesy Deccan Chronicle

Also read: When a politician weds a journalists, it’s news

Watch Supriya Menon reporting: Barter during a downturn

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