Posts Tagged ‘Doordarshan’

A rash I&B ministry “advisory” to TV, print media

26 June 2014

25riding

When he was health minister in the UPA’s first term, Anbumani Ramadoss made it mandatory for movies and TV channels to show the statutory warning against smoking and drinking each time someone on screen lit a cigarette or sipped a drink.

The Telegraph reports that the NDA’s information and broadcasting ministry under Prakash Javadekar has shot off an “advisory” to TV stations and newspapers “against portraying or “glorifying” rash or dangerous driving, as well as helmet-less riding and a failure to fasten car seatbelts.”

“All TV channels/ Doordarshan/ print media are advised to be extremely careful in portraying such stills/ images/ scenes which depict rash, negligent or dangerous driving; and in case such portrayal is necessary, then it may be accompanied by appropriate messages/ warnings,” the letter said.

The letter also spelt out a few of the possible warnings: “Over speeding kills”, “Driving two-wheeler without wearing helmet is dangerous and illegal”, “Driving four-wheeler without wearing seatbelt is dangerous.”

Read the full article: Rash driving edict to newspapers

Also read: I&B ministry “advisory” on TV protest coverage

Tarun Tejpal, Manish Tewari and relief at PBC

2 December 2013

From Off the Record, the Monday gossip column in Deccan Herald:

Tehelka editor Tarun Tejpal‘s fall from grace has brought a sense of “divine justice” in Prasar Bharati, where the invisible presence of Tejpal—thanks to his closeness to the information and broadcasting minister Manish Tewari—was one of the contributing factors behind a long-standing “difference of opinion” behind Tewari and Prasar Bharati CEO Jawhar Sircar.

“Tejpal is believed to be one of the outsider journalists, whom Tewari wanted to rope in Doordarshan in an attempt to revamp the image of the public broadcaster. Sircar opposed the move and favoured full time government employee in the DD.

“The public broadcaster’s experiment with journalists from outside like defence analysts Ajai Shukla ended in a whimper as Shukla too resigned within days. Later a Tejpal company reportedly received contracts to prepare two different programmes for the DD and there was pressure on the top brass of Prasar Bharati to air those programmes in slots with high viewership.”

For the record, Tarun Tejpal’s name was removed from the board of Prasar Bharati after the alleged sex scandal felled him, and the Indian Express reported that just before the fall, Amaraman India Pvt. Ltd, a firm owned by him, had bagged a contract for 52 shows.

Photograph: courtesy Jitender Gupta/ Outlook*

Also read: Tarun J. Tejpal steps aside as editor of Tehelka

Life yourselves up, dearie, or get into my elevator

POLL: Is sexual harassment rampant in Indian media?

Online petition to protect Tehelka journalist’s privacy

Tarun Tejpal was trapped in a skin not his own’

Tarun Tejpal: Fear and self-loathing in Goa

Aroon Purie and Vinod Mehta on Tarun Tejpal

***

Tarun Tejpal on the five facets of his life

How Congress regime stepped in to help Tehelka

A magazine, a scam, a owner & his Goan house

NYT, WSJ weigh on Tehelka‘s Goa controversy

Tehelka promoter says he didn’t turn off FW tap

Headlines Today claims it’s overtaken Times Now

7 May 2013

In a non-stop season of scams, you would expect television watchers to switch on private TV stations to get the plain, unvarnished truth?

Well, think again.

Hindustan Times once again reports that the most-watched news shows between 8 pm and 10 pm are those on the state-owned Doordarshan News.

The paper reports that the 8 pm Hindi show on the free-to-air channel had a gross rating point of 1.22 for the week ending April 27—and the 9 pm English show Newsnight had a GRP of 1.14, ahead of Times Now, CNN-IBN, NDTV 24×7 and Headlines Today.

The HT report also quotes the information and broadcasting minister Manish Tiwari, who says:

“What these ratings indicate is the rapidly changing perception of viewers about the kind of television they like to watch and is perhaps an occasion to introspect for those who have made sensationalism their staple.”

Interesting if true.

And, if true, the numbers below, which also use TAM ratings, become interesting.

Images: courtesy Hindustan Times, Mail Today

***

Also read: The most-watched TV news show at 9 pm is…

Lots of people watch Lok Sabha TV. Surprised?

Sharp, sensitive, substantive (conditions apply)

The poll straws. They are a-blowing at DD News

India’s most-watched TV news show at 9 pm is…

16 April 2013

India’s most-watched TV news show at 9 pm is, pinch yourself, DD News!

Hindustan Times reports in its gossip columns that News Night:

“the primetime news show [on DD News] between 9 pm and 10 pm topped the TAM ratings last week with 66% market share, four times the channel which comes next.”

Interesting, if true.

And if true, the numbers below, which also use TAM ratings, become interesting.

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Also read: Lots of people watch Lok Sabha TV. Surprised?

Sharp, sensitive, substantive (conditions apply)

The poll straws. They are a-blowing at DD News

‘TV news full of non-issues. So, we don’t think’

13 April 2013

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S.M.A. Kazmi, the Urdu and Persian journalist arrested in February 2012 for his alleged involvement in the attack on an Israeli embassy vehicle, and released on bail eight months later, is set to launch an Urdu daily titled Quami Salamati (national security).

In an interview in the latest issue of Tehelka magazine, Kazmi answers what is now a standard question for journalists held and released on “terror” charges:

What is your view of the current state of journalism in India?

The media, both in India and other countries, is full of non-issues to keep people from thinking. In India, we sit in front of TV news channels for hours without having heard any news. At least a Doordarshan or an AIR bulletin gives out information. There is a set of journalists I call ‘poultry eggs’. They do stories the way editors tell them to. Reading newspapers in custody, though, I still have hope for the print media. It is more responsible.

Photograph: courtesy Tehelka

Read the full interview: ‘My arrest was psychological warfare’

Also read: Nine lessons a terror-suspect journo learnt in jail

Sharp, sensitive, substantive (conditions apply)

3 April 2013

The Congress-led UPA’s election-eve attempt—like the BJP-led NDA’s attempt in 2004—to revive  Doordarshan News has come a cropper.

The Indian Express has an editorial:

“Less than two months after a splashy advertisement campaign championing Doordarshan’s new-look daily prime-time news bulletin, Ajai Shukla, the anchor/editor of its English-language segment, has put in his papers. The resignation follows recent circulars ordering that the content and guests for each bulletin be first run past Doordarshan officials, as clear a declaration of censorial intent as there can be.

“This unwillingness to walk even the first baby steps in allowing controlled autonomy to the national channel — in freeing it of daily interference — simply reinforces the popular distrust of any claim by Doordarsan to be neutral and free.

“The I&B ministry has a sport of choice, to keep inquiring into ways in which viewers can be attracted to Doordarshan, but its experiments will keep coming to naught till it reckons with the bottomline. It is this: when viewers fail to flock to the channel, it is not veracity of the news put out by the channel that is in question. It is their scepticism that the news is in any way whole, that what is being presented is the full picture.

“Whichever way the government may spin the current controversy from here, that scepticism has been shown to be proper caution. What an ironic end to an exercise intended to prove the very opposite.”

Read the full editorial: Very costly experiment

Also read: The poll straws, they are a-blowin’ in DD News

The poll straws, they are a-blowin’ in DD News

26 February 2013

To predict the meteorological weather, you have Mausam Bhavan. To predict the political weather, you have Doordarshan.

Before every general election, the government happily dips into the pockets of taxpayers and pumps in crores of rupees to revamp the supposedly “autonomous” broadcast behemoth.

And so it is in the year of the lord, 2013.

Under the new information and broadcasting minister Manish Tiwari, new appointments have been made to DD News, just as Ravi Shankar Prasad had in the NDA regime before the the 2004 elections. There are expensive advertisements in the newspapers announcing its shows; there is even a Twitter account.

Brajesh Mishra, Outlook, Indian Express and DD

8 October 2012

The passing away of the former national security advisor and former foreign service officer Brajesh Mishra last week has resulted in a welter of tributes, many very mushy, a few critical, but almost all of them throwing light on the uncomfortable influence that the Vajpayee aide held over the media—and the chummy friendship that some in the media shared with the high official in the PMO.

***

In his diary in Outlook*, Vinod Mehta recounts the role played by Mishra in ordering raids on the magazine’s proprietor after Outlook had exposed the wheeleing-dealing of Vajpayee’s “son-in-law” Ranjan Bhattacharya:

“I know one does not speak ill of the dead but try as hard as I might, I cannot think of anything nice or complimentary to say about Brajesh Mishra. All my exchanges with him were thoroughly unpleasant. Once after a few whiskies at vice-president Hamid Ansari’s house, he asked me why I had turned against Atal Behari Vajpayee.

“I responded by asking him why he had ordered the I-T raids on my proprietor’s residence in Mumbai and why he threatened me over the phone, denying a story given to us by the Vajpayee household, of how much Vajpayee disliked Arun Jaitley.”

In his National Interest column in the Indian Express, editor-in-chief Shekhar Gupta writes:

“There was, however, one time when I saw him ruffled. And let me make a clean breast of it, even if it concerned The Indian Express. This was when the paper had carried a series of exposes embarrassing the Vajpayee government: the petrol pump scam, the scam on allotment of institutional lands to Sangh Parivar front organisations, and the Satyendra Dubey (the IIT engineer murdered while working for the NHAI by the mafia in Bihar) case.

“A top official in the State Bank of India, for decades this company’s bankers, told me — with a great deal of surprise and dismay — that he had got a call from “somebody” in the PMO to give the Express trouble. He said when he told the person the Express Group had “impeccably” clean accounts he was asked if he could somehow still give it grief. The banker was an old Express reader, loved the paper, and was aghast.

“I sought time with Vajpayee, and the tea had just been served when I said to him, “Suna hai, aajkal aap ne PMO se dadagiri shuru kar di hai.” I told him the story. And I must say Vajpayee looked genuinely shocked and swore he had not given any such instructions.

“Next day I was invited to Mishra’s office. “Arrey bhai, aisi baat thi toh… why didn’t you tell me first? Where was the need to go to boss? He has never pulled me up like this, and I am not used to it,” he said, now more rattled than annoyed. He promised that it was all “freelance” activity by a Sangh Parivar “busybody” who hung around in the PMO, “misusing” people’s phones, and that the “mischief” had been nipped.”

In his Sunday Sentiments column in the Hindustan Times, the TV anchor Karan Thapar writes of an interview he did with the Pakistani president Parvez Musharraf for Doordarshan six months after the Kargil war and three months after he had staged a coup, in the year 2000:

“When I got back from Islamabad I sent him a VHS of the interview. When I rang the next morning to ask what he thought of it he said he hadn’t seen it but his tone and manner suggested he had. What followed convinced me I was right.

“‘Have you told the press about this interview?’ he asked. The question surprised me because broadcast had not been cleared and I had no assurance it would be. Doordarshan, after all, is government controlled. ‘Yes, yes, I know that,’ Mr Mishra interrupted. ‘If I were you I’d let people know.’ Then, after a pause, he added sotto voce: ‘And tell them when it will be shown.’

“Now I was certain Mr Mishra was steering me. He was suggesting a strategy that would make it awkward, even difficult, to deny broadcast but without in anyway saying it would be cleared.

“Naturally, I followed his advice. PTI put out a small story that the interview would be broadcast the next day. The Indian Express front paged it. And then the drama began. A battle waged within the government over whether it should be shown. Various ministers — and the Army Chief — asked to see it. I assumed they all had a say in whether it would be cleared.

“At 7 in the evening I rang Mr Mishra. I could tell he was chuckling when he came on the line. ‘I know you’ve rung to ask if I’ve seen the interview. I haven’t but I’ll catch it tonight on TV.’”

* Disclosures apply

Photograph: courtesy Tribhuvan Tiwari/ Outlook

How many blind people has Indian media hired?

4 January 2012

Given the rapacious human resource (HR) practises of most profit-first newspapers, magazines and TV stations (which are otherwise lecturing the world on corporate social responsibility), there are few handicapped people on their rolls and even fewer facilities for them.

Bangalore’s oldest English newspaper, Deccan Herald, is an outstanding exception.

On Louis Braille‘s birthday, L. Subramani pens a poignant 859-word piece on how the internet is the gateway to a brave new world for people like him:

“There are several thousands of persons with vision challenge who use the net to teach spoken English, creating web content and do medical transcription, which would have made Louis Braille proud.

“Ten years ago, internet was merely a tool for learning and exchanging emails. It had since evolved into a huge social medium that connects the blind with several professional groups and provide them the best opportunity to earn exposing only their advantages. Many of the visually challenged have formed professional and interest based groups in Facebook, while others have also taken advantage of Linkedin.”

Two years ago in a world-first, Bangalore Doordarshan observed Braille’s birthday by getting visually challenged people to read the news:

“Society does not take note of us. Therefore such a platform is essential. We believe endeavours like these will spur people to empathise with us better,” said one of the news readers, Manjunath.

So, how many visually challenged and differently abled people does your newspaper, magazine, or TV station employ?

Read the full article: Internet opens a new world

Photograph: Students take part in the 203rd birth anniversary celebrations of Louie Braille, organised by the national federation of the b

Also read: When the blind read the news on Bangalore DD

It’s never too late to professionalise AIR, DD

21 October 2011

Image: courtesy Hindustan Times

Also read: Who really named All India Radio as Akashvani?

How Doordarshan was launched for all of Rs 4 lakh

Pratima Puri, India’s first TV news reader passes away

Amita Malik, the first lady of Indian media, passes away

Salman Sultan: on TV anniversary, no monkeying around

Tejeshwar Singh: A baritone falls silent watching the cacophony

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