Posts Tagged ‘Homai Vyarawala’

In the digital era, affection of the analog kind

1 July 2011

She is the doyenne of news photography in India; the country’s first woman news photographer. He is the master of magazine and feature photography.

Little wonder, when Raghu Rai met Homai Vyarawalla at the launch of a new line of digital cameras in Bombay on Thursday, it was a manna from heaven for lensmen.

Photograph: courtesy Mumbai Mirror

Also read: The woman who happily shot Nehru and Gandhi

Five photography tips from ace lensman, Raghu Rai

The woman who happily shot Nehru and Gandhi

6 May 2011

India’s first woman photojournalist, Homai Vyarawalla—“Dalda” to her peers, “Mummy” to juniors—who was awarded the nation’s second highest civilian honour, the Padma Vibhushan this year, at an exhibition of her work at national gallery of modern art (NGMA), in Bangalore on Thursday.

Photograph: Karnataka Photo News

Read the coverage: The Times of India, Bangalore Mirror

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Also read: Lucky with 13, will ‘Dalda‘ get lucky at 96?

‘Why Barkha Dutt needn’t return her Padma Sri’

5 February 2011

Anurag Batra, editor-in-chief of the exchange4media group, in the industry journal, Impact:

Prabhu Chawla was awarded the Padma Bhushan in 2003. What’s fascinating is that between 2006 and 2009, six journalists were awarded the Padma Sri: Sucheta Dalal, Mrinal Pande, Vinod Dua, Rajdeep Sardesai, Barkha Dutt and Abhay Chhajlani, and one Padma Bhushan, Shekhar Gupta in 2009.

“Three out of the six Padma Sris were awarded in 2008 itself, the penultimate year of the UPA government before the elections in 2009. I remember laughing out loud when the awards were announced, as these leading journalists held debates on their respective channels about the authenticity of these awards. Not to mention that when they got it, nobody denied them or denounced them, instead the channels hailed their achievements.

“The latest on the grapevine is that the AIADMK and a few other parties are running a campaign to get Barkha Dutt to give back her Padma Sri award because of the Niira Radia controversy. I personally don’t see the point in that as in my view, Barkha has done good work in the past and continues to do so and should be judged on that. I also feel that journalists have always been influencers so there is nothing new in that.”

Also read: Padma Shri VD, Padma Shri RDS and Padma Shri BD

2008: Why Rajdeep and Barkha must decline the Padma Sri

2009: Third highest civilian honour for Shekhar Gupta

2010: Newsweek’s Fareed Zakaria gets Padma Bhushan

2011: Padma Awards for Homai Vyarawala, T.J.S. George

 

Did Radia tapes impact journos’ Padma awards?

26 January 2011

There is a palpable sense of shock among media folk that the 2011 Republic Day honours’ list contains no “working journalists” i.e. those still burning the phone lines and greasing the totempole in anticipation of the big day.

There are no awardees from the exalted world of television, with the honours going to old-world print veterans: the country’s first woman news photographer Homai Vyarawala and the editor-author-columnist T.J.S. George.

Worse, neither of the two awardees are residents of Lutyen’s Delhi or, horror, of  the national capital region (NCR): Vyarawala is based in Baroda and George is in Bangalore.

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From The Telegraph:

“Only one mediaperson, veteran T.J.S. George, made the cut to a Padma Bhushan despite the buzz that nearly a dozen were long-listed. Sources said the government was cautious about this category because at least a couple of former awardees figured in the Niira Radia tapes.”

From The Indian Express:

“The most conspicuous omission from the list are mediapersons. For the first time in several years, not a single journalist has been picked for any of the Padma Awards. It is not clear whether the decision was influenced by the controversy surrounding the Niira Radia tapes in which some prominent mediapersons have been revealed in bad light.”

Also read: Aditya Sinha on the “worldview” of Delhi journalists

Padma awards: Homai Vyarawala, T.J.S. George

25 January 2011

Last Friday, many journalists received an SMS that contained the list of names that had apparently been forwarded to the Union home ministry for consideration for the Padma awards this year.

The names: Manini Chatterjee (The Telegraph), Raj Chengappa (The Tribune), Vijay Darda (Lokmat), Arnab Goswami (Times Now), Aarti Jerath (The Times of India), Alok Mehta (Nai Dunia), Vinod Mehta (Outlook), K.S. Sachidananda Murthy (The Week), Dileep Padgaonkar (ex-Times of India), Sanjay Pugaliya (CNBC-Awaaz) and M.K. Razdan (PTI).

M.J. Akbar‘s Sunday Guardian even gave the SMS some oxygen by putting it out and a few more of its own: Barun Ganguli, Pandit Dinesh Kumar Dube and Dr Chandra Dev Pandey.

But when the Padma list came out this evening, on the eve of the 61st Republic Day, it contained none of the names that was allegedly being scrutinised by the Ministry of Home Affairs.

Instead, there was India’s first woman news photographer, Homai Vyarawala, with the nation’s second highest honour, decorated with the Padma Vibhushan.

There was T.J. S. George, founder-editor of Asiaweek magazine and editorial advisor of The New Indian Express, and a best-selling author, with the Padma Bhushan.

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Homai Vyarawala: Lucky with 13, will ‘Dalda’ get lucky at 96?

T.J.S. George: Lessons for Vir and Barkha from Nikhilda

A deep mind with a straight spine who stands tall

What K.M. Mathew could teach today’s tykes

When an editor makes way for editor gracefully

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Also read: Newsweek’s Fareed Zakaria gets Padma Bhushan

Third highest civilian honour for Shekhar Gupta

Padma Shri VD, Padma Shri RDS and Padma Shri BD

Why Rajdeep and Barkha must decline the Padma Sri

Lucky with 13, will ‘Dalda’ get lucky at 96?

30 July 2009

homai

She is India’s first woman photojournalist. In the 1940s and ’50s, her sari-clad figure is said to have been a familiar figure in Delhi, bicycling from assignment to assignment. She was paid one rupee (2 cents) for each of her first eight pictures published in The Bombay Chronicle in 1938.

Today, Homai Vyarawalla is 96 years of age. She was born in 1913. She met husband-to-be Maneckshaw when she was 13. Her first car’s licence plate was “DLD 13″. She sold her 1955 Fiat, her partner for 55 years, two months ago to lay her hands on the world’s cheapest car, the Tata Nano.

Tata Motors put her name on a priority list for the delivery of the car. Central Bank of India sent its clerk to collect the deposit amount of Rs 95,000. The first Tata Nano was delivered to a customer on July 17.

Ms Vyarawalla, who lives in Baroda, waits in eager anticipation:

“I stay alone and do everything on my own. I get things for myself from the market, and it is easier when you have a car. It is good on the company’s part which realised my urgency and came forward to offer it.”

Ms Vyarawalla still takes a few pictures, but as she said in a 2006 interview:

“I am busy getting old. Though I like to take general photographs of streets and common people, I am not into political photography in a milieu where dignity and discipline are no longer a virtue.”

Photograph: Homai Vyarawalla poses with her Speed Graphic Pacemaker Quarter Plate camera (courtesy Frontline)

Also read: The launch that showcased a thousand slips

Which paper or TV station will do this story first?

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