Posts Tagged ‘KPN’

T.S. SATYAN Awards for Photojournalists

14 December 2011

The winners of the T.S. SATYAN Memorial Awards for Photojournalism 2011: (Left to right) Yagna, K. Gopinathan, Netra Raju, Bhanu Prakash Chandra, Regret Iyer, M.S. Gopal

sans serif is pleased to announce the winners of the inaugural T.S. Satyan Memorial Awards for Photojournalism, instituted by India’s first web-based photosyndication agency, Karnataka Photo News, in association with churumuri.com, in memory of the legendary photojournalist who passed away two Decembers ago.

The awards will be presented by the governor of Karnataka, H.R. Bhardwaj, in Bangalore on Sunday.

Lifetime achievement award: Yagna, ex-Hindu, Udayavani, Mangalore

Best newspaper photojournalist: K. Gopinathan, The Hindu, Bangalore

Best professional photojournalist: Netra Raju, The Times of India, Mysore

Best magazine photojournalist: Bhanu Prakash Chandra, The Week, Bangalore

Best freelance photographer: ‘Regret Iyer, Bangalore

Best online photojournalist: M.S. Gopal, eyeforindia.blogspot.com

Nominations for the awards came from the Karnataka media academy, press club of Bangalore, Karnataka union for working journalists and the photojournalists association of Bangalore. The lifetime achievement award carries a cash prize of Rs 10,000 and a citation; all other prizes carry a cash prize of Rs 5,000 each and a citation.

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Read more about/by the winners

K. GOPINATHAN: Why namma Gopi (almost) cried in January 2008

REGRET IYER: Success is standing up one more time than you fall

M.S. GOPAL: Every pictures tells a story. Babu‘s can fill a tome

M.S. GOPAL: When Chamundi betta relocates to amchi Mumbai

The hard life and tough times of beat journalists

1 August 2011

Despite the exponential growth of media in recent years, few facilities have been created for mediapersons to cover public events of note, with their shirts intact.

Exhibit A, above, is the Raj Bhavan in Bangalore.

For years now, the governor’s house has been a beehive of political activity. Yet, journalists assigned to cover Karnataka chief minister B.S. Yediyurappa‘s resignation from office following a Lok Ayukta report that indicted him in the Rs 16,000 crore illegal mining scam, had to operate in utterly chaotic conditions on Sunday.

Print and TV reporters had to elbow each other just to stand comfortably to hear the chief minister’s remarks, and camerapersons stood dangerously on traffic barricades and other perches to capture the action, while outside broadcasting (OB) vans were parked haphazardly on the busy road.

Photograph: Karnataka Photo News

In Bangalore, 14 parties for media in 36 months

12 June 2011

PALINI R. SWAMY writes from Bangalore: Although the size of the Karnataka market is smaller than Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu and Kerala, Bangalore probably has the largest news media presence than the other three southern capitals and perhaps most other cities, barring Bombay and Delhi.

At last count, there were 14 major morning brands (eight English, six Kannada), five English business dailies, four 24×7 news channels (three Kannada, one English), and at least a dozen dailies in Urdu, Tamil, Telugu, Malayalam and even Hindi, besides a few evening newspapers.

On top of that, there are the correspondents of the various district  and “up-country” papers, magazines, and TV stations, and over a hundred photographers and videographers, plus publishers, proprietors and a handful of “resident editors” from the Press Club of Bangalore (PCB).

Even so, how big could the media contingent in Bangalore be?

One-thousand five hundred?

Yes, 1,500: That’s the number of “media-friends” that the B.S. Yediyurappa government would like to believe attended a party thrown by it on 27 June 2010 at a local hotel.

Numbers obtained by Vinayak Bhat Mooroor, a correspondent of Kannada Prabha, under the right to information (RTI) act and published by the paper on Saturday, show that the BJP government has thrown at least 27 parties (14 of them for the media) since coming to power in 2008.

While a bash for the IT-BT crowd at the Oberoi cost the government Rs 7,03,099 (75 pax), and a party in honour of an outgoing  chief justice of the high court cost Rs 5,58,000 (pax 120), the get-together for journalists last June at the Nalapad Pavilion hotel was the most expensive do, at Rs 11,04,775 (pax 1,500).

Keeping the journalists in good humour at these 14 parties has cost the BJP government Rs 20,21,924 since it came to power three years ago.

Incidentally, Kannada Prabha reports, tongue firmly in cheek, that Nalapad Pavilion does not have sitting space for the 1,500 people that are alleged to have attended the grand fete.

File photograph: A samosa, a slice of plum cake, a piece of badam burfi, half a dozen cashewnuts, and a paper napkin is laid out for media folk at a May 2011 event at the Vidhana Soudha in Bangalore (Karnataka Photo News)

Also read: Why you didn’t see this picture in the papers today

The woman who happily shot Nehru and Gandhi

6 May 2011

India’s first woman photojournalist, Homai Vyarawalla—“Dalda” to her peers, “Mummy” to juniors—who was awarded the nation’s second highest civilian honour, the Padma Vibhushan this year, at an exhibition of her work at national gallery of modern art (NGMA), in Bangalore on Thursday.

Photograph: Karnataka Photo News

Read the coverage: The Times of India, Bangalore Mirror

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Also read: Lucky with 13, will ‘Dalda‘ get lucky at 96?

Prabhu Chawla: ‘TV is dishing out cheap opinion’

5 May 2011

Prabhu Chawla, the editorial director of the New Indian Express, delivered the convocation address to the class of 2011 at the Indian institute of journalism & new media (IIJNM), in Bangalore, on Monday.

Chawla’s salient points:

# Something is rotten in the state of Indian media: Journalists have forgotten that they must report violations, not commit them. Journalists have forgotten to ask tough questions. Instead, they prefer to be supercops, judges and hangmen, all rolled in to one.

# Media is ailing from negligence and ignorance: Journalists no longer seem to have curiosity or the hunger for news. Instead, they seem to be losing credibility. Stories are not based on facts, but manipulated by politicians and corporate houses.

# Generation Next is suffering from lack of training: Most journalists are not looking for a good story any more. Neither are editors pushing them for better stories. TV channels have found the easy way of dishing out opinions instead of giving viewers information.

# Good journalism needs support from consumers: If Indian media has to be liberated from the clutches of advertisers, consumers have to pay for what they read or view. With a business model based on paid news and private treaties, advertisers have begun to dictate what goes into the news.

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View Prabhu Chawla’s PPT presentation

WHAT AILS_JOURNALISM TODAY?

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Photograph: Prabhu Chawla, editorial director of the New Indian Express, leads the faculty to the convocation of the class of 2011 at the Indian Institute of Journalism & New Media, in Bangalore on Monday, 2 May 2011. To his left is Kanchan Kaur, vice-dean. (Karnataka Photo News)

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Ask Prabhu

Vol I. No.I: Straight drives from the man behind Seedhi Baat

Vol I. No IIHome truths from the man behind Sachchi Baat

Vol I. No. III: My greatest feat and my greatest failure

Vol I. No. IV: No one can destroy Ramnath Goenka‘s Express

Vol 1. No. V: Media doesn’t need a regulatory mechanism

To get you the right angle, they sit at mad angles

13 January 2011

Newspaper photographers bend, kneel down and squat to take a bottom-up view of Infosys chief executive officer and managing director, “KrisGopalakrishnan in Bangalore on Thursday.

The IT bellwether’s third-quarter results, which were below expectations of Dalal Street, pushed down the 30-stock Bombay sensitive index, Sensex, by 350 points.

Photograph: Karnataka Photo News

Survival of tallest when politics hits a new low

11 October 2010

Initially barred from entering the Karnataka legislative assembly to cover proceedings on the day the trust motion moved by the BJP government of B.S. Yediyurappa was coming up, television cameramen compete with each other to capture the chaotic (and shameful) scenes in Bangalore on Monday.

Photograph: Karnataka Photo News

Income, outgo, assets, liabilities, profit and loss

4 October 2010

With journalistic integrity, both individual and institutional, increasingly under question with the spurt of paid news, private treaties, mediating, brokering and other wheeling and dealing, there have been growing calls for journalists to also declare their assets and liabilities, much like politicians, judges and bureaucrats.

Ravi Belagere (in picture), the colourful and sometimes controversial editor of the Kannada tabloid Hi Bangalore!—whose ad-free menu is a heady cocktail of crime, cinema, sleaze, politics and literature—has been doing just that on the pages of his paper for years now.

Every September, the popular and prolific Belagere, who also writes and publishes books, hosts television shows, acts in movies, and runs a school on top of his journalistic duties, publishes not so much a list but a confessional of what he holds and what he owes.

This is Belagere’s deeply personal “P&L statement” for the year gone by (translated from the original Kannada), published in the October 7 issue of Hi Bangalore!.

If nothing else, it offers a start.

By RAVI BELAGERE

“It is account-giving time once again.

“For someone who rode to Bangalore on his motorcycle with Rs 380 in his pocket, if I am anything today, it is because of Hi Bangalore!. For 15 years, I have been a humble servant of you, my reader, and it is my duty to present my accounts before you, my master.

“Except for two buses which I purchased for Prarthana School, I did not obtain any moveable assets  this year. For my personal use, I have a Skoda and Volkswagen, with the Skoda being put to greater use. But, as you are aware, in the second-half of the last year, my movements were restricted [due to an illness].

“There is a Maruti Omni in the garage for the use of the office staff. The Ind-Suzuki and Bullet motorcycles that are so dear to me, continue to remain parked there.

“I did not buy any new clothes either but I did buy books as if they were going out of fashion.

“I purchased a house-site in ‘Karishma Hills’ on the outskirts of Bangalore in the name of [third son] Karna and work on a new house has begun. I have bequeathed my Padmanabhnagar house, Amma, and a flat to my daughter Bhavana. The other house in Seshadripuram is already with my other daughter Chetana. At the moment, my wife Lalitha, mother-in-law, children, grandchildren, me and the dog stay in our Banashankari house, Ammi Jaan.

“Last year, I had purchased a house that [woman Friday] Nivedita had bought and donated it to Seena (nick name of Srinivas), who has been with me and been my shadow for nearly 30 years.

“As for my office, my friends keep teasing me,  ‘This is your Brindavana’. In Brahmin patois, Brindavana means final resting place. This office is my own.

“I have only one bank account, at Karnataka Bank, and have debts of nearly Rs 4 crore.

“Last year, I paid income-tax of Rs 54,44,450.

“Both the newspaper and the publishing house are in the black. The monthly employee costs of Hi Bangalore! is about Rs 4,20,000, and Nivedita is the highest-paid employee.

“There are 349 employees in Prarthana School which has 5,900 students. Their annual wage bill is Rs 2,00,82,000. Prarthana has four buildings of its own, and a small playground. Besides, I have rented two rooms. This year,too, principal Sheela was honoured by the government for the 100% pass-rate in SSLC.

“As you are aware, I devote a portion of my profits for poor students and the sick and ailing. Several children, all the way up to engineering and medical students, are availing the scholarship instituted in the name of my friend ‘SitanadiSurendra. The good news this year is that one of the girls is appearing for the IAS. Tens of heart and kidney patients, cancer victims, HIV-afflicted are benefitting from the donations.

“All the money for these ventures comes from you, the reader. My task is merely to distribute it.

“This year, thanks to my laziness, I did not write a single book. The publication of O Manase suffered hiccups for the same reason.

“From the moment Hi Bangalore! was born, my friend R.T. Vittal Murthy has been with me through thick and thin. He is my biggest asset.

“After this declaration, what more is there to admit?”

Photograph: Karnataka Photo News

Also read: ‘Editors and senior journalists must declare assets’

Well-armed gunmen shoot unarmed woman

19 August 2010

On World Photography Day, visitors write thousands of words to the background music of a fountain at Lal Bagh in Bangalore on Thursday.

Photograph: Karnataka Photo News

2009: A lensman’s eyes reaches parts others’ eyes don’t

2008: With so many legs, who on earth needs a tripod?

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Also read: Is the end nigh for black and white photography?

T.S. NAGARAJANMy most unforgettable picture

The maharaja’s elephant that made me a lensman

Why namma Gopi (almost) cried in January 2008

How a world-class yoga photograph was shot

Why the internet won’t replace newspapers—III

9 August 2010

At a rally organised by the Congress party in Bellary on Monday, upon the culmination of a fortnight-long pada yatra (foot march) from Bangalore, 320 km away, members of the audience use newspapers to protect themselves from the searing sun in Sonia Gandhi‘s former constituency.

Photograph: Karnataka Photo News

Also read: Newspapers as wall paper

Newspapers as a weapon

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