Posts Tagged ‘Priya Ramani’

The nation’s moral compass before Mr Goswami

14 July 2013

Priya Ramani, editor of Lounge, the Saturday section of the business paper, Mint:

“For residents of south Mumbai, in a faraway time before Arvind Kejriwal and Arnab Goswami, the taxi driver was this somnolent constituency’s only link to national politicking.

“In the short drive from Nariman Point to Malabar Hill, the Navbharat Times and Yashobhoomi reading taxi driver could introduce you to his India, one where citizens didn’t pay taxes and yet knew exactly what the government had been up to.

“His Mayawati vs Mulayam Singh monologue was tailored to the duration of your drive and the level of your interest. God forbid some English newspapers had convinced you that life in Bihar had improved dramatically with the rise of Nitish Kumar, he could easily provide the counter view.

“If it was your lucky day, he would dismiss the idea of a Hindu Rashtra with a cynical: All these political parties are useless. Everyone’s a %*@#%. If not, oh well, it was a healthy debate, certainly more so than those snappy Twitter altercations.”

Read the full piece: Playing spin the wheel

Note to directors: It was Shammy not Barkha

24 January 2011

No One Killed Jessica?

Well, someone ‘killed’ Harinder Baweja.

Raj Kumar Gupta, the director of last weekend’s multiplex marvel—in which Rani Mukherji essays the role of a single, bitchy, aggressive, passionate, foul-mouthed, investigative journalist probing the murder of the model Jessica Lal at a Delhi bar—may have made the world believe that his ‘wet dream’ was NDTV’s Barkha Dutt.

But, writes Priya Ramani, the editor of Lounge, the Saturday section of Mint, the sting operation that was key to the reopening of the Jessica Lal murder case was not Dutt’s (or NDTV’s) handiwork, but of Harinder Baweja’s (and Tehelka‘s). And, Baweja gets no credit in the movie whatsoever.

Writes Ramani:

“What a guy, I thought when I read Harinder Baweja’s riveting post-Babri Masjid expose in India Today magazine in 1993.

“The Bharatiya Janata Party was then claiming the demolition of the mosque was nothing compared to the 40 temples that had been razed in Kashmir. Ask them for a list, editor Aroon Purie told Baweja, and go see if the temples have actually been destroyed.

“It was January and snowing in a turbulent Kashmir as Baweja and a photographer trudged from one temple to another—and found all of them intact. They were nearly kidnapped by AK-47 wielding men; at another temple they had to face a mob and firing.

“When I met Baweja a few years later, he turned out to be a she. A 5ft, 1-inch she who prefers to be called Shammy and always wears saris with sexy, sleeveless blouses in summer and winter. When the Taliban captured Kabul, Shammy almost travelled there with her sleeveless blouses.

“Shammy is also the perfect host and believes her parties are a hit only if dinner is served after midnight.”

Read the full article: Journalism’s real wet dream

Also read: Is abusing politicians the nation’s agenda?

The face behind a famous byline behind an award

First lessons from the flirtatious hotshot editor

6 July 2010

Penguin Canada bossman David Davidar‘s hurriedly buried “consensual flirtatious” relationship with a colleague that resulted in his being sacked from the publishing house has prompted Priya Ramani, editor of Lounge, the Saturday section of Mint, to make public her own tryst with a “hotshot editor”:

“I’ll never forget my first job interview.

“The hotshot editor whose work I had worshipped growing up said he would meet me at his hotel at 7pm. When I got to the hotel, I called him on the house phone and he said, come on up.

“I shuffled around nervously for a couple of minutes in the lobby, torn between the eagerness of a 23-year-old to meet one of her journalism heroes and the thought that it was perhaps best to walk away from the job. He interviewed me over drinks besides the bed in his tiny room that was made up for the night.

“He was charming, he flirted, and I pretended not to recognize the signals. Eventually, I escaped unscathed. It was my first lesson on surviving the workplace.”

Read the full article: When boss is a consensual flirt

Also read: WSJ editor denies minister’s SMS

‘Editor the Great’

‘Tireless crusader of absurdly priced things’

5 April 2008

Media critics fall over each to deliver a slap on the wrists ofThe Times of India for dumbing down Indian journalism with its accent on all things frivolous. In the process, ToI’s otherwise self-righteous competitors who are guilty of the same sins get away.

Santosh Desai in the latest Tehelka ensures they don’t:

“The arc of descent followed by media is a feathered one. Hindustan Times pulled out all stops for its Mystique of Luxury conference where people with French names come and talk about things no one buys. This is promoted editorially and otherwise. On the day of the event, HT ran a double page spread while Mint devoted an entire issue to this burning issue. Interestingly, the journalists themselves seemed less than enthusiastic about the whole thing.

Priya Ramani’s editorial gave every possible reason why no one in the world was interested in the rich, before weakly recanting herself in the last paragraph. Renuka Narayan’s piece equated luxury with time and thus skirted the whole issue. Vir Sanghvi argued that luxury equals bags (of the Louis Vuitton variety) because rich people are fat and can’t wear designer clothes so they splurge on bags instead.

“Couldn’t agree more. We have clearly come a long way when newspapers take up the task of actively hawking things that no one really needs. Congratulations, Hindustan Times, you tireless crusader for absurdly priced things!”

Read the full column: If you can’t sell it, contact the editor

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