Posts Tagged ‘Sashi Kumar’

‘Anchoring news is easier than acting in a movie’

29 October 2013

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A number of male news journalists (Sashi Kumar, Prakash Belawadi, Dibang, Ravi Belagere) have slapped on greasepaint for roles in front of the camera in recent times.

At least one Telugu anchor (Udaya Bhanu) has starred in an item number.

Now, Sheethal Shetty, the peppy newsreader and presenter on the Kannada news channel TV9, is featuring in a lead role in a “Sandalwood” movie titled Ulidavaru Kandante (Kannada for, as viewed by survivors/witnesses).

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Shetty who has a sizeable following on Facebook, plays the role of a journalist who convinces her boss to do a story involving her childhood friends who are upto no good.

She talks to That’s Kannada.com on the difference between her two worlds.

“Anchoring is easier than acting. Everything is “live” in a news environment—the bulletins, breaking news. You adapt to the developing situation and generally find your way. In a movie, on the other hand you have to do just what the director says. We need to meld ourselves with the role….

“I used to spend 10-11 hours a day in a news studio. Food, sleep were secondary. I used to wonder what was the road ahead. I wouldn’t get time for anything. Now having stepped out, I want to learn some music and pay some attention to my health and fitness. I have even started a blog to do some writing.”

Shetty is the second TV9 Kannada anchor to step into cinema. Ranganath Bharadwaj had preceded her before he returned to news at Suvarna News 24×7.

Also read: Prakash Belawadi: Bangalore reporter who became ‘RAW agent’

For Sashi Kumar, acting is second string in bow

Karnataka gets an acting chief minister in Ravi Belagere

When a magazine editor marries a starlet, it’s news

The ex-journo who cast ‘Shah Rukh’ in a film

19 October 2013

janakivish

Former print and TV journalist Janaki Vishwanathan, whose first Hindi film Bakrapur has a goat named Shah Rukh, in an interview to Tehelka magazine:

What draws you to your topics — child labour and devdasis?

My training as a journalist made me pick on something that has a basis in reality. Also, I ceased to see cinema as just entertainment. It’s more than that. It can entertain but also inform. Even in mainstream cinema, the issues that these films talk about come from society. It’s the treatment that dilutes the issues for entertainment.

Photograph: via Twitter

Read the full interview: Janaki Vishwanathan

Also read: How a BVB course shaped writr Shashi Deshpande

How journalism helped cartoonist Manjula Padmanabhan

Prakash Belawadi: Bangalore reporter who became ‘RAW agent’

For Sashi Kumar, acting is second string in bow

Karnataka gets an acting chief minister in Ravi Belagere

78-year-old man tops MA journalism course

19 August 2013

A 78-year-old masters degree holder in mathematics, Sanskrit, Vaishnavism, and a doctorate in Sanskrit, has secured the first rank in MA journalism and communication at Madras University.

But can even Dr T.D. Krishnamachari, with four masters degrees and a PhD, hope to get a job in these bleak, depressing times when journalists, cameramen and technicians are being laid off by the sackful?

Dr Krishnamachari certainly has some multimedia skills, HR managers and bean counter please note.

During his tenure at TVS Lucas, he read the news for Doordarshan and even interned at All India Radio:

“It was the time when the likes of Sashi Kumar and Shobana Ravi were the news readers. I was much impressed with their intonation and articulation and joined Doordarshan as a Tamil news reader. But I left it after a few years.”

Three decades later, while pursuing his postgraduate journalism course at Madras University,he interned with AIR and rediscovered his voice.

In 2011, when he was 75, Dr Krishnamachari interned at The Hindu. after his first year in his fourth masters’ course:

“When I was a child, ours was the only house in the village to have a radio. Newsreaders like Poornam Vishwanathan inspired me…. Even now I only watch news on television; I do not like fiction-based programmes. So it was only apt that I took up this course.

“The news I read now is much more meaningful.”

Image: courtesy The Times of India

Also read: 81-year-old hack who never files a story, gets 3D film

Eight reasons journalism is the best profession

Congratulations: we have the worst job on earth

Happy new year to all you psychopaths

Shekhar Gupta: No better time to enter journalism than now

The 5 stereotypes of journalists in Bollywood

16 August 2013
Jaane-Bhi-Do-Yaaro

In the 1983 hit comedy, Jaane bhi do yaaro, Naseeruddin Shah and Ravi Vaswani work as freelance photographers for Khabardar, a muckraking magazine edited by “Shobha Sen”, played by Bhakti Barve Inamdar

Much as the role of the hero and the heroine has morphed in the Hindi film industry, so has the depiction of the villain and the vamp—and, of course, the journalist.

From a pure print person till well into the late 1980s, the journalist on film is now largely a TV person.

From a poorly paid, poorly dressed, paan-chewing jholawala working for a “cause”, we are now (largely) shown as slick, loud-mouthed, loose-tongued buffoons, in bed with the crooked and the corrupt, and not very different from them.

Two young London-based Indian journalists, Ruhi Khan (formerly of Hindustan Times, Mumbai Mirror & NDTV) and her husband Danish Khan (formerly of Mid-Day and Mumbai Mirror), have analysed 33 films over the last 30 years and written a paper for the journal “The Image of the Journalist in Popular Culturepublished by the University of Southern California at Annenberg.

“Our analysis revealed five popular representations of the journalist that we have classified as romantic companion, glamour chaser, investigative superhero, power magnate, and brainless mouthpiece.

“These categories, though distinct, can also find themselves sharing screen space and often overlapping in the same film’s narrative.

“These stereotypes have been so strongly entrenched in Bollywood scripts that even films inspired by reallife incidences fail to break free of them.”

Here, the Khans introduce their work.

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By RUHI KHAN and DANISH KHAN

Working as journalists in India’s tinsel town Mumbai-home to Bollywood cinema, one often comes across various public prejudices against the reporter. From being revered and trusted to help foster change for the better, to being accused of trivialising the profession or manipulating news for profits.

The IJPC article stemmed for our desire to find out how such public perceptions are influenced. In this article we analyse only one element – perhaps one of the greatest factors that can affect mass perceptions—Bollywood films.

Most commercial films are not a prism reflecting reality, but a figment of someone’s imagination and desire to see the world as he or she would like to. Hindi film is devoid of much reality and is often an exaggeration, yet it defines its audience’s aspirations and perceptions.

And this is what the article reflects—the caricature images of journalists portrayed by Bollywood, from their most Romeo-like romantic image to their most macho Rambo superhero.

We analysed 33 films over a 30-year period from 1981 to 2011, ranging from “Mr. India” to “Rockstar,” where the role of the journalist or media has been important in the film’s narrative script or has been entrenched in public memory for its journalistic aspects.

Our analysis revealed five popular representations of journalists. We found many Bollywood films depicting journalists as a Romantic Companion to the other lead protagonist. This is where the focus is on the scribe’s singing, dancing or seducing skills rather than his reporting.

A more realistic category is the Glamour Chaser where reporters are portrayed as flies fluttering around a ‘celebrity’ candy. Need we say more on this, doesn’t seem much difference in real and reel life journalists in this category?

In the Investigative Superhero category the journalist makes powerful enemies in the course of his or her investigative work, just like a superhero who takes on the bad guys. This category showed us two opposite depictions of journalists. While the first half of the period in which our analysis takes place showed investigative reporters often paying a heavy price for their work- often being martyrs in the process; in the latter part the journalist began leveraging his or her profession to safeguard himself or herself by garnering the power of the fourth estate and mobilizing public support and scrutiny.

Next, category Power Magnate shows the media as ‘kingmakers’ holding the power to sway decisions on prominent issues. Prominent senior journalists are ‘sense-makers’ where in they have the power to influence how the public should interpret complex issues.

The last category is the one most journalists in real life are very uncomfortable to even acknowledge but the reel gives plenty of examples to entrench it strongly in public memory—the Brainless Mouthpiece speaks of the most prevalent public perception where journalists are shown as brainless twits who simply follow instructions, bytes, or gossip without questioning anything.

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Read the full paper: From Romeo to Rambo

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Raveen Tandon as Shobha De: Glamourous, sexy, brainy, seductive

Look, who wants to play Christiane Amanpour: Kareena Kapoor

Emran Hashmi to play Rajdeep Sardesai, Arnab Goswami

Journalism film Dev Anand didn’t make featuring Shekhar Gupta

Ram Gopal Verma‘s hit and Rann: ‘I want to expose media’

Will the underworld a hot reporter like Gul Panag?

Anju Mahendroo plays queen bee of film journalism, Devyani

For Sashi Kumar, Ranganath Bharadwaj, acting is second nature

Finally, Karnataka gets an acting chief minister: Ravi Belagere

Will underworld dons trust such a hot reporter?

12 January 2012

Mail Today, the tabloid newspaper from the India Today group, has a report today that Gul Panag, the former Miss India Universe, has been signed up by the maverick film maker Ram Gopal Varma to play a crime reporter in an upcoming film.

The buzz in film circles is that Gul Panag may play the role of Jigna Vora, the Asian Age crime reporter who was arrested for her alleged involvement with the underworld in the murder of J.Dey, the investigations editor of Mid-Day.

But true to her movie metier, Gul Panag—a regular on the Sunday night television circuit with a number of journalists among her  followers on Twitter—is offering no confirmation.

“I play a crime reporter in the film, a woman who has made her mark in a field that is otherwise dominated by men…. All I can say right now is that the film deals with the underworld and its various connections including the media.”

On her website, Gul Panag’s bio reads “actor, activist, animal lover, adrenalin junkie, adventurer, avid traveller, automobile enthusiast and biker” all rolled into one. At least the on-screen hack has one thing in common with the rest the pack: she is a jack of all trades.

The media is a recurring theme in Ram Gopal Varma’s oeuvre. He made an Amitabh-starrer called Rann on the television industry not too long ago.

Also read: Guess who came to Rajdeep Sardesai‘s house last night

Shekhar Gupta: The journalism film Dev Anand didn’t make

Supriya Nair: When a film star weds a journalist, it’s news

Devyani Chaubal: the queen bee of Bombay film journalists

Amitabh Bachchan: I want to expose the media

Sashi Kumar, Ranganath Bharadwaj: Acting is second string in bow

Asian College of Journalism PG diploma course

10 March 2011

The Asian College of Journalism (ACJ) in Madras is inviting applications for its post-graduate diploma course for the 2011-2012.

For some journos, acting is second string in bow

4 October 2009

sashi kumar

It looks like it is the season for small screen stars to graduate to the big screen.

Sashi Kumar (top frame, left), the Doordarshan newsreader of pre-satellite television days, stars with the Malayalam superstar Mammooty in the new release Loud Speaker. In the movie, Sashi, who now runs the Asian College of Journalism in Madras, plays a US-returned astrophysicist.

In Bangalore, Ranganath Bharadwaj, an anchor at the 24×7 news channel TV9, is set to put on the greasepaint for the lead role in the slightly less scientific Kannada flick, Cheluvina Gelathi. Predictably, Bharadwaj who is happily married to co-anchor Radhika Rani, will run around trees and sing a few ditties.

Kannada print journalists are not known to squirm from movie and television roles.

Ravi Belagere, the editor of the tabloid Hi! Bangalore, has starred in several films, including the controversial Mukhya Mantri I Love You. And a host of them, including the film critic R.G. Vijayasarathy and photo editor Saggere Ramaswamy have appeared in a number of movies and TV shows.

Also read: Finally, Karnataka gets an acting chief minister

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