Posts Tagged ‘Tunku Varadarajan’

And, so, the ‘best journalist in India’ is…

12 September 2013

Tunku Varadarajan, former editor of Newsweek International, on his thambi (younger brother), Siddharth Varadarajan, editor of The Hindu, in the September issue of The Indian Quarterly:

“I think he’s the best journalist in India. He’s serious, he’s knowledgeable, he writes wonderfully. But what drives him is the urge to educate people, to edify. What he wants to get out of a piece is to improve somebody; what I want is a good read.

“I’m not a mindless provocateur, but I do believe that, if an issue raises hard questions, journalists ought not to play the ball safe with a dead bat; they out to try and square the ball to the boundary.”

Photograph: courtesy The Hindu

Also read: India’s three best cartoonists are…

India’s best editors? Just press ‘click’

The cover of the ‘last print issue’ of ‘Newsweek’

24 December 2012

photo

Newsweek, the iconic American newsweekly, has just published its final dead-tree issue with a hashtag on the cover indicating the digital direction it it heading towards.

Seventy-nine years in print, the magazine published 4,150 issues, saw 11 logo redesigns and had 17 editors at the helm, including the Indian-born Fareed Zakaria.

Also read: Second editor of Indian origin for Newsweek

Who, when, how, why, where, what and WTF

How a slumdweller became a Newsweek reporter

‘Magazines, like mushrooms, should grow in the dark’

Look, who wants to play Christiane Amanpour!

10 November 2012

Priety Zinta‘s role in Lakshya is rumoured to have been based on NDTV anchor Barkha Dutt. Now, Bollywood actress Kareena Kapoor is tipped to play CNN anchor Christiane Amanpour in Prakash Jha‘s next film, Satyagraha.

Mail Today reports that Jha visualised Kareena’s role of a reporter who reports at the international level.

“The director was reportedly influenced by the huge fan following that Amanpour, famous for her reportage from war zones, enjoys…. Kareena has been closely observing Amanpour to play the character perfectly. Her look will be modelled on Amanpour’s daily style,” a source was quoted as saying.

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Visit Christiane Amanpour’s blog: Amanpour.

External reading: Tunku Varadarajan vs Amanpour

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Also read: Will underworld dons trust such a hot reporter?

Enter: the queen bee of Bollywood film journalists

Mouth ka saudagar to play Arnab and Rajdeep

For some journos, acting is second string in bow

Finally, Karnataka gets an ‘acting’ chief minister

 

‘Newsweek’ prize for South Asian commentary

2 May 2012

PRESS RELEASE: The American newsweekly Newsweek and the website The Daily Beast are offering a prize for the best commentary writing in South Asia in partnership with the Open Hands Initiative in order to celebrate and nurture outstanding talent and find fresh voices covering the region.

The aim of the prize is to promote and support the work of an individual who has contributed thoughtful, important, and engaging commentary on the great social, political, and cultural issues of their region.

The prize offers $25,000, a one-month residency at the Norman Mailer Center and Writers Colony in Provincetown, Massachusetts, and a biweekly column for a year on The Daily Beast. The winner will be honoured at a dinner at the Asia Society in New York City on June 20.

Any nominated columnist, journalist, or writer based in and writing about South Asia (Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bhutan, Sri Lanka, and Bangladesh) is eligible for the prize. Only commentary written in the year prior to submission will be considered eligible for the prize.

Nominees must be available to travel to New York for the June 20 prize ceremony.

Editors, publishers, and writers across South Asia may nominate the best English-language columnists and journalists  or apply by sending us three to five examples of their work and writing a brief letter explaining why that particular individual deserves this recognition.

A panel of prominent international journalists and media experts— including writer and historian William Dalrymple, Editor of Newsweek International Tunku Varadarajan, Newsweek & The Daily Beast books editor Lucas Wittmann, author and journalist Sir Harold Evans, and Madhulika Sikka, executive producer, NPR—will read the submissions to select one winner and two finalists.

To submit a nomination, email commentaryprize@newsweekdailybeast.com

Second editor of Indian origin for ‘Newsweek’

10 December 2010

Tunku Varadarajan, the Indian-born, US-based writer-educator, has been named the new editor of Newsweek international, becoming the second journalist of Indian origin after Fareed Zakaria to hold the reins at the American magazine.

Tunku broke the news through a tweet on Wednesday: “My news: Looks like I’ll be editing Newsweek International”.

Born Patanjali Varadarajan, 48-year-old Tunku—named after the father of Malyasia’s independence—is currently writer-at-large at The Daily Beast, the online magazine floated by legendary British editor Tina Brown. His appointment comes as part of the revamp of the struggling magazine, after the Washington Post company sold it to stereo tycoon Sidney Harman for one dollar (Rs 45) earlier this year.

Tunku, whose brother Siddharth Varadarajan works for The Hindu in New Delhi, has served as the correspondent of The Times, London, in Madrid and New York; worked at the editorial and op-ed pages of the Wall Street Journal; and taught business at New York University and journalism at Stanford.

When his old boss Rupert Murdoch (who owns The Times) bought the WSJ, Tunku left to join Forbes.com.

In 1997, the 50th anniversary of India’s independence,  a  New Yorker item listed the nattily dressed Tunku, then 34, as one of New York City’s “most in-demand bachelors”.

“‘At the Times, we used to have a rule. Always dress as if you might have to go to a funeral or interview a Cabinet minister’…

“How often is he invited out? ‘Every day, I fear. A lot of these calls I take completely blind,’ he says, sipping a Scotch-and-soda. ‘If the person’s voice sounds nice, I tend to say yes. I suppose this could get me into a lot of trouble.’

Cricket-mad Tunku, a firm believer in the gung-ho vivacity of British newspapers as opposed to the deadly dull objectivity of their American counterparts, called Pakistan a “State of nothing” on that midnight child’s 50th anniversary.

Photograph: Tunku Varadarajan with wife Amy Finerty. The couple have a son, Satya (via Facebook)

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Also read: Who, when, how, why, where, what and WTF

How a slumdweller became a Newsweek reporter

‘Magazines, like mushrooms, should grow in the dark’

Six questions for Stephen Farrell and NY Times

15 September 2009

Tunku Varadarajan, the former foreign correspondent of The Times, London, currently a professor at NYU’s Stern Business School, asks some excellent questions on the abduction and rescue of Stephen Farrell, the “seemingly reckless” New York Times journalist, by the Taliban in Afghanistan, at Forbes.com.

1) Did not Farrell assume the risk of some harm befalling him? Should he have been allowed to suffer the effects of his own recklessness?

2) Does not the enterprise of democracy and informed consent depend on people like Farrell to ferret out information of public value?

3) Can Farrell be held “morally” responsible for the death of the soldier in the course of his rescue? Or were the Brits entitled not to seek to rescue him since he had disregarded specific advice?

4) Should the New York Times reimburse the British government for the cost of the mission to save Farrell (even if it means taking another loan from Carlos Sim)?

5) Should NYT also compensate the families of the dead soldier and Farrell’s “fixer, the Afghan interpreter who too met his end in the  course of the rescue?

6) Should journalists give half the royalties from any books they write to the military, in the event of a costly rescue?

Farrell, according to The Guardian, had been kidnapped twice before “in the line of duty” had earned the enviable tag of “Robohack” from competitors.

Read the full article: The price of a scoop: two dead

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